Food Security and Nutrition Framework

Author(s)

Mohammad A. Alshuniaber ,

Download Full PDF Pages: 30-38 | Views: 168 | Downloads: 66 | DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3710763

Volume 4 - February 2020 (02)

Abstract

The state of food security and nutrition is a vital issue for governments. It is recommended to govern food security in a systematic approach to enable governments to achieve food security and to eliminate all forms of malnutrition. Food security and nutrition (FSN) systems should be measurable, primary food security indicators should be regularly observed and assessed. THE efficient FSN system should be capable of providing sufficient food at affordable prices for everyone. It should guarantee a stable and resilient supply to meet food demands and to deliver a nutritious and quality diet. However, the national FSN system should be capable of dealing with food security challenges and should address food security-critical and emerging issues. Achieving the desired state of food security and nutrition can be hindered by geopolitical instability and food prices and price volatility. The prevalence of poverty and hunger, especially in rural areas, would stress the food security system. Finally, sustainable agriculture and food systems are important factors for efficient food security and nutrition systems. This review paper aims to illustrate significant food security challenges that need to be considered by any food security and nutrition system

Keywords

Climate change; Geopolitical stability; Food loss and waste; Food security; Malnutrition; Poverty; Sustainability

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